Kyusho Jitsu, strikes to vital points, demonstrated by Evan Pantazi

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This excellent clip by Evan Pantazi show examples of strikes to kyusho, or vital points, and their powerful effect on the human body. Atemi strikes in aikido are little emphasized despite the fact that Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba used them extensively in his techniques.

This excellent clip by Evan Pantazi show examples of strikes to kyusho, or vital points, and their powerful effect on the human body. Atemi strikes in aikido are little emphasized despite the fact that Aikido Founder Morihei Ueshiba used them extensively in his techniques. This video should be viewed by aikido practitioners to whom the huge benefits that the judicious use of atemi offer should be obvious.

Selected by Sakura Mai

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1 Comment
  1. Atemi, at least imo, are both simple and difficult. What’s simple is just hitting something. What’s difficult is actually producing useful strikes. It’s not just a matter of power or even aim. It’s a matter of timing and emphasis. When I was teaching at the Chinese Kenpo school the seifu, Bill Ponder, used to defend no contact/light contact drill. His take was not to put much power into strikes… unless they were actually through the defenses, on target and going to make a difference. Easily said. Applying that in aikido I first had to parse out where the strikes had been before being edited out. Kaiten nage uchi mawari is a good place to start. What you quickly figure is putting too much power into any one of the strikes ends the technique at that point. Then you get the martial koan, “Do I pull my punches in order to finish the technique I want, or is the technique what happens when my early strikes don’t work?” I like the idea that aikido techniques are all answers to obscure “what-if questions”. You know those. “What if the guy uses that old Mongolian strangle hold my mother-in-law likes (or insert anything else at that point)?” Another take is that when your techniques evolve from the situation, and they bear at least a passing resemblance to those you trained in the dojo, that’s the beginning of takemusu aiki.


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