Over 360,000 views! Stefan Stenudd on atemi and aikido

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In this video, Stefan Stenudd Sensei of Sweden, demonstrates a number of atemi sequences that can be applied as setups for the execution of aikido techniques. Some good training drills are shown.

In this video, Stefan Stenudd Sensei of Sweden, demonstrates a number of atemi sequences that can be applied as setups for the execution of aikido techniques. Some interesting training drills are shown.

Click here to watch Aikido – ATEMI on youtube.com

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3 Comments
  1. Hmm…..both do not move with the natural bio-mechanics of those who have studied seriously….the centre line enbusen is incorrect and mutual combat one is in the way of the attackers second strike which is absolutely coming. Further it assumes that you will stop someone once you hit them which is just so silly. Most fighters do not actually get really angry until they have been hit several times hard……I also note that the taisabaki is parallel to the line of attack and not sankaku which is not actually O’Sensei’s teaching. Further when striking someone in the groin the angle is up not down or parralel. You may get a limited neuro-response but it will not stop someone if they are serious. I also note that the Irimi is clashing and has applied force again parallel to the line of force. It should rightfully take balance on the diagonal and not be used as a reply atemi without actually being targeted to the mid mandible and using the inner forearm bone as the tool of impact…. Anyway a few thoughts in protection of others which is our primacy…..

    • admin says:
      Posted June 7, 2013 at 3:06 pm | Permalink

      Perhaps you could upload a video that illustrates the points you are making.

  2. Mario Forget says:
    Posted July 27, 2014 at 8:29 pm | Permalink

    Interesting indeed. The approach using atemi to creat a reaction of Uke is I believe a good approach. Especially, when the agressor (Uke) is possibly much bigger than Tori. As practice of Budo, it is proper practice to make sure that the attacker is controlled with minimal injuries. So atemi brings the attacker to submission with a “little” pain to ensure that Tori completes Kake with continued Kuzushi. The only concern I would have is that the atemi becomes the peek of the defense… when it is important to keep the Atemi as a distraction and applying the technique is kept as the focus. That would still be Budo. Otherwise it becomes more “jutsu”. Depends on the intent!

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